Coca-Cola tagged posts

Can the truth be stranger than fiction?

My 16-year-old daughter Zara loves Instagram. So does her 11-year old sister, Aviva.

I hope they don’t mind me sharing that with you! And probably millions of others like them all over the world are aimlessly scrolling through Instagram rather than doing their homework on a wet Wednesday evening when they need a break from studying or are simply bored of checking out vlogs on YouTube – another favourite pastime rather than watching TV (which they don’t).

What’s interesting is the way that, post after post, about fashion, make-up, music, games, staying healthy and what to say to boys tends to have the same captions.

With young children and teenagers, social media is part of their everyday experience through the screen of a smartphone...

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Unilever crowned top global advertiser and Coca-Cola top individual global brand in WARC League Table 2014

Unilever

Unilever is the smartest advertiser on the planet according to research carried out by global marketing intelligence agency WARC.

The top five global advertisers on the WARC advertiser rankings:

Warc global brand rankingsThe advertiser scores are derived from the brand owners’ performance in effectiveness and strategy in the previous 12 months.

Coke campaign

However, the world’s leading individual brand is Coca-Cola, according to the rankings for individual brands:

Warc top global brandsIn compiling the individual brand league table, WARC tracked more than 1700 winners in 75 different competitions. It assigned points based on the awards won and then weighted these points based on the competition’s rigour and prestige in the global industry according to its own analysis.

Louise Ainsworth, CEO, WARC explains: “These rankings show which companies ...

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Coca-Cola bends to public pressure to put calorific values on its products

TL systemIn a spectacular volte-face, Coca-Cola has embraced the voluntary front of pack ‘traffic light’ system that alerts British consumers to the calorific value of the product in order for them to make informed choices about what they are ingesting and help move them towards having a more balanced diet and healthier lifestyle.

What’s disappointing is that the beverage giant didn’t have the foresight to embrace this opportunity last year when the voluntary labelling scheme was first introduced by the Government.

By missing this opportunity, Coca-Cola made it look like it had something to hide and this also reflected negatively on its reputation.

The result of this stance was that Coke had placed a question mark over its carbonated product lines that these were in some way were contributi...

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What the arts can learn from sport when it comes to sponsorship

QB15This isn’t a one-way street of course. There’s a lot that sports can learn from the arts – for example creating unique experiences that reach desired audience and customer segments in a precise way that’s memorable and doesn’t suffer from ‘sponsorship clutter’ that often afflicts much bigger property types such as a premier league football club.

However, the arts sector needs to become much more commercially savvy in helping itself achieve anything like the success achieved by sports rights owners over the last 40 years that has generated billions in support of sports and entertainment that relies on sponsorship income for its existence.

Earlier this week, UK arts charity House of Illustration opened its doors as the world’s first gallery celebrating illustration in all its f...

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Ambush marketing threat to global sponsors!

Pepsi unofficialDuring major sports events, non-official sponsor brand owners will start to consider actively pursuing ‘guerrilla or ‘ambush marketing’ tactics as they seek a free ride on the back of major events such as the Commonwealth Games in GlasgowFIFA World Cup in Brazil, the Tour de France or the Wimbledon Tennis Championships.

But like so much in marketing, they’re two schools of thought on the subject of ‘ambush marketing’.

Pro-ambush

Those who are in favour of ‘ambush marketing’ including the European Sponsorship Association (ESA) argue it’s a perfectly acceptable form of marketing activity for a non-sponsor to be engaged with provided it doesn’t break any ethical Codes of Conduct that may be in place to regulate sales, marketing and communication activities in its...

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The new frontier in marketing isn’t what you’d expect!

campbells2Over the last decade, marketers of branded fast moving consumer goods (FMCG) on both sides of the Atlantic have struggled to withstand the onslaught on their market share from challenger and own-label brands.

The result of increased competition – largely fuelled by globalisation – is that some marketers have been forced to radically re-think their retail and marketing strategies in order to stay ahead of the game. So it may surprise you to learn that packaging innovation has become the ‘go-to’ marketing strategy for these FMCG marketers in order to preserve and boost profitability.

US-based MeadWestvaco Corporation (MWV), a global leader in packaging and packaging solutions, has just published the results of its research with 7,665 consumers in UK, Germany, Turkey, Russia, South Afri...

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Brand-Vandals1At the end of last year, a new book by Steve Earl and Stephen Waddington hit the shelves and caused a bit of a stir. Brand Vandals was a polemic about the dangers facing any organisation as it struggles to manage its reputation in the face of determined vandals out to destroy it on social media.

“Media has become a two-way weapon. Nobody can control it. It’s anarchy.”

Assuming you didn’t suffer nervous shock or call the emergency services after reading the first chapter, the book goes on to describe a world where luckless PR managers are fighting an ever losing battle against brand vandalism. At every twist and turn brand reputations lay shredded like coleslaw and devoured by baying, internet-frenzy mobs impervious to reason and from whom it’s impossible to hide.

OK, it was a bit...

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‘Brand Wars’ at Sochi Olympic Games 2014

Tapping over Apple logo at Sochi 2014So the question on most marketers’ lips at the half-way stage of the Sochi Winter Olympic Games 2014 is who’s winning brand gold and who’s coming last in the multi-million dollar sponsorship stakes?

Well, this picture sums up the problem, doesn’t it?

An Olympic Official at Sochi with duct tape sticking it over the Apple logo of the laptop belonging to Associated Press director of international video Mark Davies. As if this pretty innocuous indirect view of an Apple logo on this laptop justifies this type of treatment?

Well, it’s bonkers really but then you need to understand the reasoning behind this extreme form Olympic brand protection.

Non-Olympic partners such as Apple are considered to be in direct competition with the official Olympic sponsors at Sochi 2014, such as Samsung t...

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Are you a consumer-ologist?

mash upAmazon built a gigantic global business on the back of choice and delivering products when the customer wants it.

As I mention in my previous blog, Amazon has taken this a step further and is planning to box and deliver products that it expects customers in a specific area will want based on previous orders, product searches, wish lists, shopping cart contents, returns and other online shopping practices it gleans from its customers’ shopping patterns, even before they’ve clicked ‘buy.’

However, some researchers are predicting a backlash to these and other strategies that are all designed to get us to spend more.

The main contentious point of consumer-ology, a term coined by Philip Graves, one of the world’s leading consumer behaviour experts, is that enough really is enough when it ...

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US-based James Bruno, SVP International at cloud computing giant Vocus shares his thoughts about the future of marketing


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AK: What marketing trends have you seen on both sides of the Atlantic?

JB: If you’d asked me this question 25 years ago when I was working in the UK in the pharmaceutical industry, I would’ve said there was a distinct cultural approach to how we marketed products in the US versus the UK.

Fast forward 25 years and it’s amazing to see the cultural divide has basically evaporated which I would attribute to globalisation of the economy and I don’t think you can avoid the impact of the internet has had on markets and competition.

I think it’s interesting to note that the changes in marketing we’ve witnessed over the last five years have trumped the changes that have taken place in marketing over the last 100 years and these changes are being felt the world-over.

The big transformat...

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